In the Media

Why is it so hard to get justice in revenge porn cases? (Thred)

Extract:

Almost ten years ago, Charley reported her half-brother to the police upon discovering he was posting images of her and other women on a porn site.

Despite pleading guilty, her brother was only given a six-month suspended sentence, put forward for a sexual offenders’ rehabilitation programme, and banned from using social media after displaying remorse.

‘We were granted a restraining order for one or two years, but he never went to prison really or anything substantial which he should have had,’ says Charley.

Charley’s story, regretfully, is one among many where victims of revenge porn haven’t seen justice.

According to Refuge, from the start of January 2019 to the end of July 2022, 13,860 intimate image offences were recorded. However, only 4% of instances resulted in the alleged offender being charged or summonsed, while 22% faded away entirely due to ‘evidential difficulties’.

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‘I mean, it’s [English Justice System] mildly effective,’ says feminist lawyer Dr. Ann Olivarius. ‘You have to have a police department that is actually going to prosecute, and the Metropolitan Police are more infected with the problem themselves of misogyny and inappropriate behaviour and have all sorts of allegations.’